Trinidad and Tobago and the Universal Declaration of Linguistic Rights

Trinidad and Tobago and the Universal Declaration of Linguistic Rights In 2013, two UWI, St Augustine linguists island-hopped across to the island of O‘ahu in Hawai‘i for the 3rd International Conference on Language Documentation and Conservation (ICLDC). The theme was “Sharing Worlds of Knowledge.” We shared our knowledge on “The Diversity of Endangered Languages: Documenting three endangered languages […]

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ASL around the world: A Trinidadian, an Englishman, a Nigerian and a Guyanese walk into a park in Guyana…

In 2012, I made the short trip to Guyana to meet with members of the Deaf community in the capital, Georgetown, to see some of the work being done by a group then called Deaf in Guyana, now called the Deaf Association of Guyana (DAG), and to do some initial linguistic research. Walking through Georgetown’s beautiful botanical […]

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Four superhuman jobs performed by sign language interpreters in Trinidad and Tobago

The University of the West Indies, St Augustine  is currently accepting applications to its Undergraduate Diploma in Caribbean Sign Language Interpreting. The programme will train people who already have some signing ability to become (better) interpreters. If you can’t sign yet, don’t worry: start now and maybe you can apply for the programme next time […]

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Signed Xhosa, double doubles, and other problems for sign language interpreters

Since my last post about the pseudo sign language that appeared and rapidly disappeared at Piarco Airport, an even more shocking story emerged about the fake sign language interpreter at Nelson Mandela’s memorial. You can watch him in action here. Predictably, there have been unfunny jokes (the joke being essentially: “sign language looks funny, lol!”), and hasty apologies. There have been […]

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